music.

I am josh. I compose and play violin, piano, saxophone, and mandolin. this is a mostly original blog about all things music. feel free to leave an ask. enjoy.
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tierradentro:

“The Lute Player" (detail), c. 1612/20, Orazio Gentileschi.

tierradentro:

The Lute Player" (detail), c. 1612/20, Orazio Gentileschi.

#tbt Wells and Gladys playing my Shostakovich waltz arrangement from 2012 <3

surrealism:

Jazz by Man Ray, 1919. Oil on canvas, 71.12 x 55.88 cm. Columbus Museum of Art, Columbus, Ohio.

surrealism:

Jazz by Man Ray, 1919. Oil on canvas, 71.12 x 55.88 cm. Columbus Museum of Art, Columbus, Ohio.

Holy Porsche!

This is the cathedral my recital is going to be in!!!

likeafieldmouse:

Francis Bacon - Three Studies for a Crucifixion (1962)

m-wear:

Most Expensive Car in Britain
The beautiful car, a 1957 Ferrari Testa Rossa, was previously owned by a businessman named Eric Heerema, and was sold to to Derbyshire dealer Tom Hartley Jr. The 1957 Ferrari which was described as one the best in the world, has now become the most expensive car in Britain, sold at the price of £24 million, which means aprox. $40 million.
The car, known as Chassis 0704, was designed by Sergio Scaglietti, the legendary Ferrari pioneer, and until his death at the age of 91, it was one of his favourite models.
Pictures of the most expensive car in Britain

m-wear:

Most Expensive Car in Britain

The beautiful car, a 1957 Ferrari Testa Rossa, was previously owned by a businessman named Eric Heerema, and was sold to to Derbyshire dealer Tom Hartley Jr. The 1957 Ferrari which was described as one the best in the world, has now become the most expensive car in Britain, sold at the price of £24 million, which means aprox. $40 million.

The car, known as Chassis 0704, was designed by Sergio Scaglietti, the legendary Ferrari pioneer, and until his death at the age of 91, it was one of his favourite models.

Pictures of the most expensive car in Britain

(via ferrariserviceaz)

uvre:

Richard Aldrich

uvre:

Richard Aldrich

(via uvre)

therachstarr:

"The trouble with music appreciation in general is that people are taught to have too much respect for music; they should be taught to love it instead.”
—Igor Stravinsky

therachstarr:

"The trouble with music appreciation in general is that people are taught to have too much respect for music; they should be taught to love it instead.

—Igor Stravinsky

(via psybelius)

Askeys

C major:

What instrument(s) do you play?

c minor:

What discourages you about studying music?

C♯ major:

What do you love about your teacher?

c♯ minor:

What are you jealous of in other players?

D major:

Who is your favourite composer and why?

d minor:

What performance do you wish you had never heard?

E♭major:

What attracts you to studying music?

e♭minor:

What is your most mortifying performance moment?

E major:

What part of your playing are you most proud of?

e minor:

What is the most difficult thing about your instrument?

F major:

What was the most memorable performance you ever attended?

f minor:

Would you give up music? What would be the reason?

F♯major:

What is your proudest performance moment?

f♯ minor:

What is your greatest music-related fear?

G major:

What is your favourite thing about your instrument?

g minor:

What are your bad practicing habits?

A♭major:

Where do you see yourself in ten years?

a♭minor:

What is your least favourite part of your musical community?

A major:

What is the greatest music-related advice you've ever been given?

a minor:

What instrument(s) do you wish you played?

B♭major:

What is your favourite part of practicing?

b♭minor:

What aspect of your teacher frustrates you?

B major:

What is your favourite part of your musical community?

b minor:

Who is your least favourite composer and why?

gutaigroup:

Kazuo Shiraga, Shoukou, 1989

gutaigroup:

Kazuo Shiraga, Shoukou, 1989

(via eskisanat)

likeafieldmouse:

Tiril Hasselknippe

ohhowlucky:

danteogodofsoup:

killbenedictcumberbatch:

standupcomedyblog:

John Mulaney | The Salt & Pepper Diner

THE BEST JOKE IN EXISTENCE

GOD I JUST TOLD SOMEONE ABOUT THIS STORY

This is one of the best pieces of comedy that I have ever had the pleasure of witnessing. I love this. I have been looking for this online for awhile.

I already had his special on and this came up on my dash

(Source: timetoputonashow, via mel3ctric)

composersdaily:

 April 23rd | Sergei Prokofiev (1891-1953)

Piano Sonata no.7, “War” - III. Precipitato

Lang Lang, Piano

Sergei Prokofiev, born on this day in 1891, showed precocious talent as a pianist and composer and had lessons from Glier from 1902. In 1904 he entered the St. Petersburg Conservatory, where Rimsky-Korsakov, Lyadov and Tcherepnin were among his teachers; Tcherepnin and Myaskovsky, who gave him valuable support, encouraged his interest in Scriabin, Debussy and Strauss. He had made his début as a pianist in 1908, quickly creating something of a sensation as an “enfant terrible,” unintelligible and ultra-modern - an image he was happy to cultivate. His intemperateness in his early piano pieces, and later in such works as the extravagantly Romantic Piano Concerto no.1 and the ominous no.2, attracted attention. Then in 1914 he left the conservatory and travelled to London, where he heard Stravinsky’s works and gained a commission from Diaghilev: the resulting score was, however, rejected (the music was used to make the “Scythian Suite” a second attempt, “Chout,” was not staged until 1921.

Meanwhile his gifts had exploded in several different directions. In 1917 he finished an opera on Dostoyevsky’s “Gambler,” a violently involved study of obsession far removed from the fantasy of his nearly contemporary Chicago opera “The Love for Three Oranges,” written in 1919 and performed in 1921. Nor does either of these scores have much to do with his “Classical” Symphony, self-consciously 18th-century in manner, and again quite distinct from his lyrical Violin Concerto no.1, written at the same period and in the same key. There were also piano sonatas based on old notebooks alongside the more adventurous “Visions fugitives,” all dating from 1915-19.

Towards the end of this rich period, in 1918, he left for the USA; then from 1920 France became his base. His productivity slowed while he worked at his opera “The Fiery Angel,” an intense, symbolist fable of good and evil (it had no complete performance until after his death, and he used much of its music in Symphony no.3). After this he brought the harsh, heavy and mechanistic elements in his music to a climax in Symphony no.2 and in the ballet “Le pas d’acier,” while his next ballet, “L’enfant prodigue,” is in a much gentler style: the barbaric and the lyrical were still alternatives in his music and not fused until the 1930s, when he began a process of reconciliation with the Soviet Union.

The renewed relationship was at first tentative on both sides. “Romeo and Juliet,” the full-length ballet commissioned for the Bolshoi, had its première at Brno in 1938, and only later became a staple of the Soviet repertory: its themes of aggression and romantic love provided, as also did the Eisenstein film “Alexander Nevsky,” a receptacle for Prokofiev’s divergent impulses. Meanwhile his own impulse to remain a Westerner was gradually eroded and in 1936 he settled in Moscow, where initially his concern was with the relatively modest genres of song, incidental music, patriotic cantata and children’s entertainment (“Peter and the Wolf,” 1936). He had, indeed, arrived at a peculiarly unfortunate time, when the drive towards socialist realism was at its most intense; and his first work of a more ambitious sort, the opera “Semyon Kotko,” was not liked.

With the outbreak of war, however, he perhaps found the motivation to respond to the required patriotism: implicitly in a cycle of three piano sonatas (nos. 6-8) and Symphony no.5, more openly in his operatic setting of scenes from Tolstoy’s “War and Peace,” which again offered opportunities for the two extremes of his musical genius to be expressed. He also worked at a new full-length ballet, “Cinderella.” In 1946 he retired to the country and though he went on composing, the works of his last years have been regarded as a quiet coda to his output. Even his death was outshone by that of Stalin on the same day.

yeeeeeeeeeee